Happy Record Store Day. If you’re not out at your local record store right now, please remedy that forthwith.

893thecurrent:

"I understood the vinyl resurgence when I could interpret it as purely ironic: a way to make fun of your parents’ music, and their format. Then, though, there started to be signs that it was something much more serious. My friends—friends younger than me—were paying real money for vinyl copies of new releases. In what seemed to me a a bizarre inversion of the Boomers’ vinyl-to-CD transition, people were even buying vinyl records to replicate their CDs. At shows, bands started selling records instead of CDs. Eventually, people started giving me records as sincerely intentioned presents, assuming I’d love them and assuming I had the infrastructure to play them.
"Wait, what? Why would I love a format that I’d gleefully, seemingly with everyone’s encouragement, kicked to the curb as soon as I could afford to? Why would I even own a record player? What was everyone getting so excited about? Look! There’s the Internet! All the music is there, most of it essentially free!
"I tried to take a principled stand. I wanted to pay artists, I explained—I just wanted to pay them digitally. Wouldn’t that be easiest for everyone? The vinyl re-boom seemed to me reactionary, Gen Y hipsters rebelling against their yuppie parents with the happy encouragement of Gen X and Boomer music heads who had never given up on vinyl in the first place. I’d walk into music stores where record sections were expanding to eclipse CD sections, and I’d think, but we know how this ends!”
read the rest: How I learned to love vinyl (again)

This. Happy Record Store Day.

893thecurrent:

"I understood the vinyl resurgence when I could interpret it as purely ironic: a way to make fun of your parents’ music, and their format. Then, though, there started to be signs that it was something much more serious. My friends—friends younger than me—were paying real money for vinyl copies of new releases. In what seemed to me a a bizarre inversion of the Boomers’ vinyl-to-CD transition, people were even buying vinyl records to replicate their CDs. At shows, bands started selling records instead of CDs. Eventually, people started giving me records as sincerely intentioned presents, assuming I’d love them and assuming I had the infrastructure to play them.

"Wait, what? Why would I love a format that I’d gleefully, seemingly with everyone’s encouragement, kicked to the curb as soon as I could afford to? Why would I even own a record player? What was everyone getting so excited about? Look! There’s the Internet! All the music is there, most of it essentially free!

"I tried to take a principled stand. I wanted to pay artists, I explained—I just wanted to pay them digitally. Wouldn’t that be easiest for everyone? The vinyl re-boom seemed to me reactionary, Gen Y hipsters rebelling against their yuppie parents with the happy encouragement of Gen X and Boomer music heads who had never given up on vinyl in the first place. I’d walk into music stores where record sections were expanding to eclipse CD sections, and I’d think, but we know how this ends!”

read the rest: How I learned to love vinyl (again)

This.

Happy Record Store Day.

For Record Store Day, the Minus 5 are releasing a massive 5 record album called Scott the Hoople In The Dungeon of Horror, recorded in Scott McCaughey’s basement. Each record is color coded according to which rotating band members contributed, as I understand it. And you can hear a 5 song playlist — one song from each album — on YouTube; the first song (“Mickey’s A Cool Drummer”) is embedded above. 

From Yep Roc Records:

To celebrate, the band is rolling out one song from each of the five LPs, in the YouTube playlist below, including: “All The Trouble I’ve Made” - from the orange-colored LP, Without A Gun; “Mickey’s a Cool Drummer” - from the green-colored LP, Of Monkees and Men; “The Zero Clowns” - from the blue-colored LP, An Accumulation of Soot; “Kill the Dead” - from the purple-colored LP, Hell Bent for Heaven; and “Adios Half Soldier” - from the red-colored LP, War is Over.

Don’t forget to support your local record store this Saturday, April 19 on Record Store Day. I’ll be at Zebedee’s RPM on 39th, if anybody needs me.

David Lamb has passed away, a victim of his leukemia. 

Here’s a set recorded live at Dirt Floor Studios in Chester, CT. The world will miss this man’s art. 

Filmed live 3/3/12 at Dirt Floor Recording Studios, Chester CT
Dirt Floor Studios & HawkHill Media presents Live - From Dirt Floor: Episode 1 - Brown Bird
Brown Bird performs songs from their most recent album ‘Salt For Salt’ and previous album ‘The Devil Dancing’
1. Ebb & Flow (abbreviated)
2. Fingers To The Bone
3. Thunder and Lightning
4. Blood Of Angels
5. Muck And Mire
6. Down To The River
7. Bilgewater
8. Cast No Shadow

Albums available at BrownBird.net, sad-music.net, and iTunes.

A Kansas City Royals dinner. With White Sox Fans. In Minneapolis.

What a world, what a world.

mightyflynn:

A few weeks ago, Josh Ostergaard invited me and a mutual friend, Larry Von Kurtze, to dinner at his apartment. Josh, a Royals fan, is the author of the forthcoming book The Devil’s Snake Curve, described by his publisher (Coffee House Press) as, “a humorous, historical, and hirsute miscellany that’s the baseball book Howard Zinn would have written, if he hated the Yankees.” I read an advance copy and, friendship aside, I can assure you it’s a terrific book. Order a copy or pick one up when it’s available in stores April 15th.

Anyway, back to the dinner. Josh is hosting a series of dinners to promote his book, using recipes culled from the 1976 Kansas City Royals Cookbook. On the night we visited, Hal McRae’s Swiss Steak and a waxy red glop called Mama Mayberry’s Strawberry Pie were on the menu. We had a great time prepping food, talking baseball, and watching preseason ball. Josh wrote about it for his new tumblr blog, The Devil’s Snake Curve.

Read the post about our dinner and follow The Devil’s Snake Curve on Tumblr for more culinary adventures with the 1976 Royals, and for more info on the release of The Devil’s Snake Curve.

Ain’t Blues Too Sad

Greg Kot of the Chicago Tribune has published one of his BBC On The Record columns on why sad songs appeal to so many of us.

In it, he details a research paper published last year in Frontiers in Psychology which finds, in part:

sad music has a counterintuitive appeal – it actually makes people feel better. Sad songs allow listeners to experience indirectly the emotions expressed in the lyrics and implied by the (usually) minor-key melodies. The sadness may not directly reflect the listener’s own experiences, but it triggers chemicals in our brain that can produce a cathartic response: tears, chills, an elevated heartbeat. This is not an unpleasant feeling, and may explain why listeners are inclined to buy sad songs and why artists want to write or sing them.

So there you have it. Read Kot’s whole article here. And then click the Spotify link below so you can listen to “Ain’t Blues Too Sad” by Roky Erickson, from the True Love Cast Out All Evil album (with Okkervil River). It’ll make you feel better, I swear.

http://open.spotify.com/track/2dVr3XX6Ze9vPG4gopSiJZ

Sensitive Boys

What a great day: Opening Day, sunshine, top down, and Alejandro Escovedo on the speakers and in my memory.

You can hear a live version of this tune right here, below, recorded by SoundCloud user hobosoul on an iPhone.

"Sensitive Boys"

Sensitive boys

Sensitive clothes

Sensitive words

Wrapped up in sensitive poems

Big dreamy eyes

Long French sleeves

Shivering in the cold light

Of the New York City heat

Sensitive boys

Here they come

Nothing’s ever what is seems

Too much just ain’t enough

Wore it like an open wound

You always felt too much

Faded posters

Peeling off the walls

Sensitive boys

Want all your love

And they want no luck at all

Sensitive boys

Don’t you let ‘em get you down

Sensitive boys

Turn your amps up loud

Go ahead and run us off

But make your baby proud

The road to nowhere

The rubber back in your face

But I’m still out here somewhere

And no one can take your place

Sensitive boys

The world needs you now

Sensitive boys

I need you

More than ever now

We saw Alejandro Escovedo at Knuckleheads last night, and it was a great show. His cover of Neil Young’s “Like A Hurricane” was stunning, as was his solo acoustic version of “Sister Lost Soul” - that one completely silenced the place, as we all watched slack-jawed. “Always A Friend” was also a highlight. If you were there, you know what I’m talking about. If you weren’t, you can have a little “Like A Hurricane” from the last time Alejandro played Knuckleheads, just last summer. This performance features David Hidalgo of Los Lobos standing in on guitar.

EDIT: The Kansas City Star’s review of the show is here.

Don’t Follow Me (I’m Lost)

This just arrived - can’t wait to watch it. It’s the William Miller documentary on Bobby Bare Jr.

"An intimate ‘fly on the wall’ documentary about iconoclastic rocker Bobby Bare Jr., son of country music legend Bobby Bare, and his struggles dealing with the repercussions of a perpetual life on the road — the constant separation and the disconnect from loved ones back home."

Featuring My Morning Jacket, Justin Townes Earle, Hayes Carll, David Vandervelde, Blue Giant, Duane Denison, Carey Kotsionis, and Bobby Bare Sr.

Here’s the trailer:

And, as a bonus, here’s Bobby Bare Jr performing Rock n Roll Halloween:

 

Double bonus: the signed poster for the film:

mightyflynn:

3rd
cover painting by Amelie Mancini


New album from The Baseball Project, just in time for Spring.

mightyflynn:

3rd

cover painting by Amelie Mancini

New album from The Baseball Project, just in time for Spring.