Avast, me hearties! Arrrrrrrrrr!

Avast, me hearties! Arrrrrrrrrr!

nprmusic:

Nick Cave is the subject of a different kind of rock documentary called 20,000 Days on Earth, which attempts to debunk the creative process for what it actually is: “It is just hard labor.”

(via kristen-kay)

Christopher S. Bond Bridge

Kansas City, Missouri

September 10, 2014

Christopher S. Bond Bridge

Kansas City, Missouri

September 10, 2014

Tags: kcmo

spencertweedy:

Dave Itzkoff wrote a really nice piece about Sukierae in the New York Times (!!!).

My new favorite boy band: Tweedy.

The drive home. 

Fruit Bats - Lives of Crime

The drive home.

Fruit Bats - Lives of Crime

Trouble Sleep Wake Yanga Am

My Morning Jacket w/ Merrill Garbus + Brittany Howard

This is pretty stunning. Like 14 minutes of stunning.

I am an American aquarium drinker
I assassin down the avenue

I am an American aquarium drinker
I assassin down the avenue

abloodymess:

Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds - People Ain’t No Good

It ain’t that in their hearts they’re bad
They can comfort you, some even try
They nurse you when you’re ill of health
They bury you when you go and die

It ain’t that in their hearts they’re bad
They’d stick by you if they could 
But that’s just bullshit
People just ain’t no good

I know it’s well understood.

rollingstone:

Willie Nelson, America’s most beloved outlaw, opens up about his craziest weed stories, the IRS, his pal George Clooney and the death of his close friend Ray Price in our new issue.

Excellent profile. My favorite paragraph:

The hippie and redneck worlds famously converged at 1972’s Dripping Springs Reunion, country music’s Woodstock moment. The bill combined new acts such as Walker, Waylon Jennings and Kristofferson with vets like Bill Monroe and Ernest Tubb. Drawing only 18,000 people over three days, it was a financial disaster, but Nelson used the same location the next year to stage the similar Willie Nelson’s Fourth of July Picnic. It drew 40,000, establishing him as the pre-eminent leader of a new, slightly dangerous music scene. “Backstage it was pot, whiskey, pills and some cocaine,” Jennings said. “The audience was as twisted as we were: all day and all night drinking hot beer.”

rollingstone:

Willie Nelson, America’s most beloved outlaw, opens up about his craziest weed stories, the IRS, his pal George Clooney and the death of his close friend Ray Price in our new issue.

Excellent profile. My favorite paragraph:

The hippie and redneck worlds famously converged at 1972’s Dripping Springs Reunion, country music’s Woodstock moment. The bill combined new acts such as Walker, Waylon Jennings and Kristofferson with vets like Bill Monroe and Ernest Tubb. Drawing only 18,000 people over three days, it was a financial disaster, but Nelson used the same location the next year to stage the similar Willie Nelson’s Fourth of July Picnic. It drew 40,000, establishing him as the pre-eminent leader of a new, slightly dangerous music scene. “Backstage it was pot, whiskey, pills and some cocaine,” Jennings said. “The audience was as twisted as we were: all day and all night drinking hot beer.”

Carbon Leaf

Saturday, August 30, 2014

Boulevard Stage at the Kansas City Irish Fest